Tuesday, July 5, 2011

10 Questions That Have No Right to Go Away by David Whyte: Question #2

This is question #2 and I feel he really sums it up at the end: "What can I be wholehearted about now."  That is a really immense question.  We are so busy trying to *get* something else that we just don't pay attention to what we have *now*.  We want to be able to the full expression of "that" pose, we want the job/house/car/entertainment system/computer/iPhone, we want... we want... we want...   But what if we stopped and acknowledged what we have now?  Can we find contentment by simply being in the present? 

10 Questions That Have No Right to Go Away

By David Whyte


Oprah.com
June 15, 2011

2) What can I be wholehearted about?

So many of us aren't sure what we're meant to do. We wonder if we're simply doing what others are doing because we feel we don't have enough ideas or even enough strength of our own.

There was a time, many years ago, working at a nonprofit organization, trying to fix the world and finding the world didn't want to be fixed as quickly as I'd like, that I found myself exhausted, stressed and finally, after one particularly hard day, at the end of my tether, I went home and saw a bottle of fine red wine I had left out on the table that morning before I left. No, I did not drink it immediately, though I was tempted, but it reminded me that I was to have a very special guest that evening.

 
That guest was an Austrian friend, a Benedictine monk, Brother David Steindl-Rast, the nearest thing I had to a really wise person in my life at that time or at any time since. We would read German poetry together—he would translate the original text, I read the translations, all the while drinking the red wine. But I had my day on my mind, and the mind-numbing tiredness I was experiencing at work. I said suddenly, out of nowhere, almost beseechingly, "Brother David, speak to me of exhaustion. Tell me about exhaustion."

And then he said a life-changing thing. "You know," he said, "the antidote to exhaustion is not necessarily rest."


"What is it then?"


"The antidote to exhaustion is wholeheartedness. You're so exhausted because you can't be wholehearted at what you're doing...because your real conversation with life is through poetry."


It was just the beginning of a long road that was to take my real work out into the world, but it was a beginning.


What do I care most about—in my vocation, in my family life, in my heart and mind? This is a conversation that we all must have with ourselves at every stage of our lives, a conversation that we so often don't want to have. We will get to it, we say, when the kids are grown, when there is enough money in the bank, when we are retired, perhaps when we are dead; it will be easier then. But we need to ask it now: What can I be wholehearted about now?


photo by scifiwithparika.blogspot.com


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